Tag Archives: route 66

The Most Perfect People I Know

When I saw Teresa Miller post a picture of her and husband John’s 1960 Winnebago travel trailer decked out for Christmas on Facebook, I knew I had to borrow that for the cover for The Small Trailer Enthusiast Facebook page. But the more I thought about it, I realized I couldn’t just post that picture without going a little more in depth about the Winnebago and the folks who own it.

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John and Teresa bought their Winnebago in 2013 while they still lived in Iowa, and aside from the exterior paint, it’s all original.

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I had a chance to visit them at their southwest Missouri home in September to look into not only their Winnebago, but also their vast collection of Chevrolet Corvairs. They’ve got a great small trailer, they’re avid Chevrolet Corvair enthusiasts, and they live on Route 66. Since I’ve been involved with all three of those subjects throughout my 47 years, that makes John & Teresa just about the most perfect people I know!

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As for their Winnebago, the interior is all original, with the exception of the curtains. Everything else is how it was in 1960, and the Millers tell me it’s in campable condition.

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As for their Corvairs, I counted about a dozen scattered throughout their northwest corner lot on Missouri Highway 266 (an old alignment of US Route 66) and County Road 1210, which is just over 20 miles due west of Springfield. They purchased the home over a year ago and finally were able to move in full time earlier in 2015. Having owned two Corvairs myself totaling some 15 years, I was equally as interested in their herd of air cooled wonders as much as I was their trailer.

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John & Teresa welcome road warriors traveling Route 66 to stop by to check out their Corvairs (and the Winnebago) they have on display in their huge yard that faces Route 66. It’s across the street from the popular stop for 66 travelers, the Gay Parita Station, so have your camera at the ready for some good photo opportunities at both locations.

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To learn a little more about John & Teresa Miller, you can visit their website at http://jtvairs.com/.

(First three photos courtesy Teresa Miller)

 

 

 

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New Sisters on the Fly Book Set for December Release

This past weekend I attended a Route 66 conference in Edwardsville, Illinois. The 3 day event featured panel discussions and workshops related to topics from historic preservation to marketing of Route 66. A section of the facility at the Wildey Theatre in Edwardsville was set up for authors, artists, and other groups and their displays. It was there where I met Karen West and Susan Ford-West.

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Karen and Susan were there promoting their new book that’s due for release late this month or early in December. The book, titled Sisters Get Their Kicks on Route 66, chronicles this past May’s 2400 plus mile journey down Route 66 from Chicago to Santa Monica by the women’s outdoor adventure group, Sisters on the Fly. The group consisted of over 300 “sisters” and their vintage trailers.

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I looked through the advanced copy they had at the conference. The 144 page book will include 5o0 color photographs as well as stories from some of the participants. You can pre-order the book through Amazon at this link: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1591521645/ref=rdr_ext_tmb

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RVing on Route 66

 I’ve been a Route 66 enthusiast since the early 1990’s and have driven a portion of it every year since 1993, as it’s some 3 hours away from my central Indiana home. Throughout the years, I’ve exclusively driven Route 66 via car and stayed in motels, while never really giving campgrounds a second look.

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However, this year we decided to see Route 66 in a different light. Recently we hitched up our Shasta and took our 4 year old grandson on an RV trip along Route 66 to Amarillo, Texas. The trip encompassed some 8 camping nights at 7 different RV parks along the 1,000 mile journey to Amarillo, picking up Route 66 in St. Louis. This post is to provide some insight on how you too and comfortably RV on Route 66, as well as give an overview of the RV parks we stayed in along the way.

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Traveling the 80-85% of what’s left of US 66 in an RV, one needs to be prepared. For some, the challenge may be too much. But if you can come to terms with a few inconveniences such as maybe parking a few blocks away in a big parking lot in a small town to get to that “must stop” café or roadside attraction, you’ll find that little inconvenience is more than worth the trouble. Also, much of Route 66 can be a little bumpy and unforgiving. Afterall, there are many sections of 66 (especially western Oklahoma) that still uses the same 80+ year old Portland concrete that carried traffic when it was a commissioned highway. To aid in the adventure of traveling 66 by RV (or even just in your car), I highly suggest picking up a copy of Jerry McClanahan’s EZ66 GUIDE For Travelers, available through Amazon and other online sources.

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Jerry does an excellent job of giving some important “RV Alerts” when a section of 66 may be difficult for an RV and should be avoided. Jerry has been documenting various alignments of Route 66 for over 30 years and is a well-respected “road scholar” and photographer. He’s also quite the accomplished artist as well. His art studio is in a house just about a block off Route 66 in Chandler, Oklahoma. Visitors are welcome to stop by (306 Manvel) and browse his artwork that’s for sale, have your EZ Guide signed, or even have a picture taken.

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My best advice if traveling 66 in an RV is to use your best judgment and don’t forget to pack your common sense before you pull out of the driveway. Route 66 is never far from an interstate, so if you find a section that is getting a little too rough, you can always jump on the super slab in a short amount of time.

Now to the meat of our trip! Just a couple of notes. All sites were pull throughs with full hookups. We also received a 10% discount at the KOAs by using our VKR  discount card, and 10% at non-KOAs by using our Good Sam membership card.

Night One: Route 66 KOA. Springfield, Missouri. Recently I gave a review of this KOA on the southwest side of Springfield, so I won’t go into too much more detail, as I covered it in this post here. Despite the nearby railroad that frequents a couple times an hour, this is a well run KOA, and strong supporters of Route 66. Cost: $42.15IMG_8565

 

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Night Two: Cross Trails RV Park, Sapulpa, Oklahoma (southwest Tulsa). Where, oh where to begin with this one? If you look through their website, it sounds like nothing but sunshine and roses:

Sapulpa’s newest RV Park located on 7 Scenic acres with all the amenities that you need to feel at home. We are located in the scenic hill country on the Southwest side of the Tulsa metro area. We use the Eaton Powerhouse Pedestal that has 50/30/20 Amp electrical plugs, TV cable jack as well sewer, trash and free WiFi internet access. Our clubhouse offers a Laundry Room, Showers , a Playground area for the kids, a Dog Park, Picnic Area and Storm Shelter.”

You’d feel at home there for sure…if your home was on the surface of the moon. Why they’re open is beyond me. It’s situated next to a storage unit atop a slight hill next to I-44 and Route 66. They’re new in the sense that they’ve started construction and decided to go ahead and “open” without being anywhere close to done. There are concrete pads and electrical posts with water, but most of the pads don’t have electric and they’re covered with construction materials. We were in phone communication with the owner on the way there, but upon arrival, no one was around to take our campsite fee. When we got back from dinner, we contacted the owner and were told his son would meet us by the dumpster to take our money. At this point it was dark and I was getting a bit nervous. Approaching the fence that separates the storage facility from the campground emerged the son, where I gave him my campsite fee through the fence. From there, he disappeared into the darkness. I’m still not sure if I was in a Breaking Bad or Twilight Zone episode.

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The advertised “clubhouse” was closed the entire time we were there, likely because it was still under construction. And the dump station didn’t look like it was usable, although we did have a full hookup site.

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I can’t say that once we got unhitched for the night we had a “bad” experience, although the place is a far cry from what the website portrays. But the whole thing was just…weird. I would suggest until they show any kind of progress in completing the place and having an actual staff on duty to avoid this place. And that’s putting it mildly. Cost: $30

Nights 3Elk City/Clinton KOA, Foss Oklahoma.  Due to some wicked 25 mph constant crosswinds, we had to make it a short day on the road. We pulled into the Elk City/Clinton KOA, situated about halfway between Elk City and Clinton Oklahoma. There’s not much thrill to this KOA compared to some, but that’s OK. We were greeted by a friendly staff and given our site number among some shady trees on this hot western Oklahoma afternoon. The park is the only thing there is at this interchange of Interstate 40. It’s a good overnight stop when you’re on the road looking for a place to pull over for the night. They do have a decent playground that kept my grandson content for the afternoon. Cost: $34.65

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Nights 4 & 5: Oasis RV Park, Amarillo, Texas. The Oasis RV Park was quite the extreme from our experience on Night 2 near Tulsa. Here there are 180+ sites with all level concrete pads with full hook-ups and multiple shower houses and laundry facilities. This park, just west of Cadillac Ranch on the south side of I-40 near the Arnot Road interchange, caters heavily to retirees. Even though our Shasta is practically new at just 6 months old, I felt a little out of place being nestled amongst $100,000+ motorhomes and high end fifth wheels. I didn’t mind though, as we felt safe and sound there. Amarillo is a GREAT place for RVers to stay. There are several good RV parks in town where you won’t have any worries. I narrowed our choice down to two, so I let my grandson pick based on the playground. It worked out well, as we stayed at the Oasis RV Park in….our Shasta Oasis. There’s a Love’s Truck Stop 1/2 mile up the road near the interchange, so that makes fueling up before hitching up a nice convenience. There’s a good photo op on the grounds as well with a motorhome buried nose-first into the Texas soil, which is a nice tribute to the park’s neighbor to the east, Cadillac Ranch. Amarillo is probably my favorite Route 66 town. When there, be sure to visit the Jack Sisemore RV Museum, located on the grounds of the Jack Sisemore Traveland RV dealership. It’s small, but they have an impressive display of RVs from several eras. Click here for more info. Cost for two nights: $65.70.

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Night 6: Twin Fountains RV Resort, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Much like the Oasis RV Park in Amarillo, the Twin Fountains RV Resort in Oklahoma City caters to a lot of retirees with high dollar rigs. This place was a fantastic stay, and we were sorry we were there for only one night. The grounds were well groomed and they offered a nice lodge with 24 hour laundry, swimming pool, miniature golf, and a few extra niceties like massages and a hot tub. The park is located next to I-44/I-35 on the near southeast side of OKC, just north of Remington Park. I can’t say enough good things about this place. We look forward to heading back there sooner rather than later. Cost: $40.05 

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Night 7: Joplin KOA, Joplin, Missouri. Our 2nd to last night on our trip was at the KOA in Joplin, Missouri next to the interchange of MO-43 and I-44. Like the KOA between Elk City and Clinton, Oklahoma, this KOA is geared towards overnight stops. However, I give HIGH marks to the staff here. Any shortcomings at the facility are quickly washed away with the great staff at this park. They went out of their way to offer us any assistance we needed. The park was clean, although surprisingly sparse on the Friday night we stayed there. Someone who saw a picture of our campsite suggested we were parked in a drive-in movie lot instead of a campsite. They have a really nice playground here, but the big draw for my grandson was the fish pond. Stocked with perch, carp, and monster catfish, the office has free fish food you can take out under the shade of the gazebo and feed the fish and ducks who also patrol the grounds. I score this with HIGH marks just for this feature alone. Cost: $38.60

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Night 8: St. Louis West – Historic US 66 KOA , Eureka, Missouri. This was our final stop on our trip. We had stayed here in 2013 and it left a positive enough impression on us to stay here again. Unlike the Joplin KOA, this one was heavily activity oriented. We had a prime spot next to the pool, with Route 66 in front of us. There was a bounce house for the kids, and Sunday morning they offered t-shirt coloring for the kids as well. Again, no complaints this trip either. This KOA offers a lot of good sites for tent camping, has several Kamping Kabins, and even has a nice pavilion, where a wedding reception happened to be taking place the night of our arrival. There’s also a real caboose near the front of the park that you can sleep in for the night as well. With a well stocked shop filled with a good variety of Route 66 souvenirs, this is one of the better places for anyone RVing on Route 66 to stay when in the St. Louis area. Cost: $44.76

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We found traveling Route 66 with an RV to be a really fun experience…one that we weren’t sure about when we left home. What we found out is that there is a good amount of RV parks out there along the shoulders of 66 that eagerly cater to those specifically traveling Route 66, just as those who are out there discovering 66 via car and staying in motels. And we found some of those RVers ourselves, as I encountered several RVs at some of the parks that were sporting Route 66 license plates or decals affixed to their RV. But this trip also gave us the luxury of staying in our own bed each night, while still moving to a new place each day.

If you’re doing your own research on RV travel on Route 66 and contemplating your own journey, I wholeheartedly recommend it. It’ll give you a new way to explore Route 66 with all the comforts of home.

If you have any questions on RVing on Route 66, please leave a comment below or shoot me an e-mail: pat@smalltrailerenthusiast.com

 

 

 

 

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RV Park Review – Missouri’s Springfield Route 66 KOA

I haven’t done many RV Park or campground reviews, but felt compelled to give notice to one we recently visited.

We were in Springfield, Missouri for the Birthplace of Route 66 Festival and decided to haul our trailer out instead of going the motel route. We chose the Springfield Route 66 KOA because of its location close to the city. We arrived Friday afternoon and were greeted by the front desk staff and escorted to our campsite (25), per the usual KOA protocol.image

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The Springfield Route 66 KOA is smaller as most KOAs go, with about 75 RV sites and a combination of 9 Kamping Lodges, Kottages, and Kabins. But the smaller size also meant a more laid back atmosphere with little noise. However, if you’re a fan of railroads, there’s a line nearby that’ll keep your attention. IMG_8342[1]

Our site, number 25, was a full hook-up pull-through site that was nestled between many tall trees, which offered plenty of shade during this hot August weekend.

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But one of the main reasons I want to give notice to the Springfield Route 66 KOA is because of the subject that’s in their name: Route 66. Anyone who’s known me knows that Route 66 is a big part of my life, and has been for more than 20 years. What made this trip darn near perfect was that I was hauling our trailer on Route 66, enroute to a Route 66 festival, while staying at a campground with Route 66 in their name. The only thing that would’ve made it perfect is if the Springfield Route 66 KOA was actually ON Route 66! But as it goes, the KOA is located about a  mile south of Route 66 through the western edge of Springfield.

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Although they may not be located on the shoulders of the fabled Mother Road, they embrace Route 66 as if they’ve been there since the road’s inception in 1926. Owners Scott & Diane King have owned their KOA since 2004 after leaving their home in California. As business owners in a Route 66 town, the Kings definitely get it. From the signs that stand guard next to the homemade cows in the front of the office to the well stocked camp store filled with just about anything a Route 66 road warrior could use, the Springfield Route 66 KOA should be included as a must stop for anyone traveling Route 66. As Diane told me, she’s open to giving just about any kind of Route 66 merchandise a try in the camp store, so there’s a good chance you’ll find something new anytime you go in.

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IMG_8361[1] The Springfield Route 66 KOA should be the southwest Missouri stop for any RVer traveling Route 66, and dare I say even the non-RVing Route 66er. The Kamping Kabins, Lodges, and Kottages on the premises offer “komfortable” accomodations and a different way to get your sleeps on Route 66 when compared to a motel, and worth the experience. As a matter of fact, a fellow Route 66er in town for the festival happened to stay in one of the Kabins the same weekend we were there, and she told us she frequents the KOA Kabins all across the country when traveling Route 66.                   b98ec9bf-21ff-4fb4-9f60-8612d71b313dphotodaee997e-f190-480c-ade3-98067a7c04f0_jpg

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b98ec9bf-21ff-4fb4-9f60-8612d71b313dphoto3b57da6a-73a4-4b39-991a-96953e287b03_jpg             (Kabin photos courtesy Springfield Route 66 KOA)

As traveling the two-lane highways of America goes, most non-RVers blow by campgrounds and RV parks without giving them a second look. And admittedly I was that way before I bought my first trailer. But whether you travel by car, motorhome, or have a trailer hitched to your rear, the Springfield Route 66 KOA is worthy of a visit, whether you bunk up for the night or just stop in to buy a Route 66 t-shirt or sticker in the camp store. For my fellow Route 66 enthusiasts reading this, we all know we aim to support those businesses that support Route 66. Let this be your introduction to another Route 66 business to add to that list.

You can find more information about the Springfield Route 66 KOA at their website at http://route66koa.com

 

 

 

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Camping along Missouri’s Route 66

In late July and early August, my wife & I had the opportunity to attend the International Route 66 Festival in Joplin, Missouri. Although it was some 525 miles from our home base in Indiana, we decided to blend two of our loves for this trip: Route 66 and camping.

We camped four nights in our Serro Scotty on this trip at three different campgrounds, all in Missouri. This was also the first time we ever had camped anywhere on Route 66, so we had some research to do in regards to where to camp on those particular nights.

For the first night, we chose the Lady Bug RV Park just west of Cuba, Missouri. The Lady Bug is a small, privately owned park consisting of a mere 30 sites. However, they had excellent amenities there, including clean shower facilities, a fully stocked store, swimming pool, and friendly service from owner Charlotte. The Wednesday night rate of $23 gave us a full hook-up pull-thru site with wi-fi (although it was down).

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While the Lady Bug is at an interchange just north of I-44 with no other services, there is some fun to be had within 6 miles east along State Highway ZZ, which is also the path of old US Route 66. Just a mile east on Route 66 from the I-44 exit where the Lady Bug is located stands the World’s Largest Rocker, located at the Fanning Route 66 Outpost. Standing 42′ 1″ tall, the rocker is quickly becoming one of the more photographed tourist attractions along Route 66, with the help of billboards along I-44 luring travelers off the interstate and on to Route 66 for a picture and a cold drink and souvenir at the outpost.

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Less than 5 miles east of Fanning is the town of Cuba. If you’re a fan of barbeque, one of the best you’ll find is Missouri Hick Bar-B-Q, located on the east side of Cuba on 66, next to the historic Wagon Wheel Motel. Route 66 through downtown Cuba is a great stretch to park the car…or your tow vehicle…and take a stroll and view some of the murals dotted throughout town, depicting the town’s history dating back to 1857: http://cubamurals.com

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Our second night we found ourselves at our campsite for the following two nights: The Big Red Barn RV Park in Carthage, Missouri. While it may not suit some campers because of a lack of a swimming pool, it suited us just fine and gave us the things we value in our camping experience: peace and quiet. The Big Red Barn is nestled east of US 71/I-49, just off a country road, just far enough away from the noise of the highway, but close enough to Carthage (less than 5 minutes) if you need something a larger town has to offer.

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The Big Red Barn was also an excellent stay for us. With our Good Sam Club discount, our total bill for two nights was $63, consisting of another full hook-up site, but with this one also offering cable TV hook-up. Restroom and shower facilities were fine and our escort to our site after checking in is always a nice touch no matter where you’re staying. Whether you’re visiting nearby Joplin or Carthage, there are plenty of things to take advantage of in the area, including a drive-in movie at the 66 Drive-In, the Precious Moments Chapel, or a photo opp at the historic Boots Motel, all in Carthage.  For more things to see & do in Carthage, visit the Carthage Convention & Visitors Bureau at http://visit-carthage.com

Following our visit to Joplin and the International Route 66 Festival (check out the full details on that here on our road trips blog: http://roadtripmemories.com/2013/08/02/july-31-august-4-2013-international-route-66-festival-joplin-missouri/), we made our way back east through the Missouri Ozarks for our final night of camping just outside of St. Louis at the KOA in Eureka, along the shoulders of Route 66. We had stayed at a KOA only one time prior, and the service at the Eureka KOA was just as top notch. As anyone will tell you, yes, you do spend more at a KOA, as our water & electric-only pull thru site for $39 would indicate. However, the service by the entire staff was exceptional. You pretty much know what you’re going to get with a KOA, and for some, that peace of mind goes a long way.

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This last night on our trip was especially nice because of the three campgrounds, the Eureka KOA was the only one of them actually along the shoulders of Route 66. This also meant this was the first time we ever got to camp along Route 66, which is something we’ve been waiting & wanting to do for several years.

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St. Louis has a long list of things to do for tourists, from the Gateway Arch to Six Flags to The Hill, St. Louis’ Italian District. However, the lone night we stayed at the KOA, we met up with a couple of friends who live nearby who camp at our house during the Indianapolis 500. We had a great dinner at the Big Chief Roadhouse, a bustling eatery that dates back to 1929 on the old Manchester Road alignment of 66. From there it was on to a spot that is as famous to St. Louis as Stan Musial and the Mississippi River: Ted Drewes Frozen Custard, located on Chippewa Street in the St. Louis city limits.

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This camping trip along Missouri’s 300+ miles of Route 66 was a good test to see how well a small trailerite would do traveling an historic highway where having to stop for photos is a “must do”, as my wife is quite adept when it comes to roadside photography. It’s easy when you’re just in a car and can pull off to the side of the road for a picture or can just pull into the location. However, when you have a 16′ trailer behind you, that can pose some challenges. My advice if you’re on an historic highway trip and hauling a trailer is to BE PATIENT. Know your surroundings, be cautious of where you want to turn around, and just use good judgement. You can still get that cool shot of that old abandoned gas station, but you have to put some careful thought into making it happen.

If you’re a novice Route 66 traveler, I highly recommend getting your hands on Jerry McClanahan’s EZ Guide to Route 66, available here. Also, when planning your Route 66 camping trip, Route 66 News has a comprehensive list of campgrounds on or near Route 66, which you can find here.

Safe travels…

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RV Museum Opens In Amarillo

Amarillo, Texas RV dealer Jack Sisemore Traveland recently opened a 7,000 square foot museum to house fifteen classic travel trailers and motor homes they’ve restored and collected over the past 25 years. Several of the RVs on display have some sort of historic significance, including the 1948 Flxible Clipper driven by actor Jeff Daniels in the 2006 movie RV.

Others include the very first Itasca motor home ever built and the oldest Fleetwood travel trailer known to exist. There’s a nice range of RVs here, ranging from a 1946 Kit teardrop to a 1974 Winnebago. All told, the museum consists of trailers and motor homes from the 1930’s through the 1970’s.

According to the Amarillo Globe-News, the museum welcomed over 400 visitors in just the first week. Admission to the museum is free, and is located on the grounds of Jack Sisemore Traveland, 4341 Canyon Drive, Amarillo, TX, which is about 3 miles south of Route 66 (6th Ave.) near the Georgia Street/I-27 interchange.  Hours are Monday-Saturday, 9am-5pm.

 

(images courtesy Jack Sisemore Traveland RV Museum)

 

 

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The Impetus of The Small Trailer Enthusiast

As The Small Trailer Enthusiast approaches the completion of four months of existence, the idea came to mind to write about how this blog came to be, and with that the inspiration for it. It wasn’t until the last three years or so that I’ve become interested in small travel trailers. My wife & I had wanted a teardrop trailer for many years, but it had always been one of the many “maybe some day” dreams we all have. When we did finally pull the trigger and purchase a T@B in 2009, it seemed to instantly fuel an interest in all travel trailers small. I’m not alone in this interest, as many of the small trailer brotherhood I know also will take interest in a diminutive towable they might see at a campground.

So what gave me the idea to start The Small Trailer Enthusiast? You need go no further than a 2400 mile ribbon of asphalt and concrete known as Route 66. My interest in this fabled highway goes back some three decades. 66 has been a big part of my adult life. Before I was married, it wasn’t anything for me to hit the road on a whim and take a 3 or 4 day weekend out west on the Mother Road for either a steak dinner 1,000 miles away in Amarillo, Texas, or 4 hours away for frozen custard in St. Louis, Missouri. It was because of 66 that I met my bride of nine years. We both had an interest in 66 and eventually met through a mutual friend who also had the same love of Route 66. Would it be a surprise to anyone that we had a Route 66 themed wedding or that we took our honeymoon on Route 66? How many of you didn’t see that coming?

 

With this interest in 66, I have always stayed on top of news from my favorite two-lane. Most of my news came from various publications and online message forums, but in 2005 Route 66 News changed the face of how information from 66 got to the general public. Started by Route 66 enthusiast Ron Warnick, Route 66 News has received nearly 3,000,000 visits over the past six years. Not only is it an excellent source of up to the minute news from the road, but is also an equally good database of Route 66 business information ranging from restauarants, motels, events, and yes, even campgrounds along its 2400 mile shoulders.

This leads up to this summer when the idea came to me to come up with a news blog relating to small travel trailers, loosely modeled after Route 66 News. Being a member of a few online forums dedicated to smaller trailers of various makes, I thought putting together a news blog for this niche just might work. So far, I’ve been pleased with the gradual growth since its inception on September 3. Daily hits to the site have gone from 9 per day in September to 77 per day as of December 15. I fully expect that number to increase as content on the site increases.

The things I look for to put on the site will focus on new models as well as news relating to existing models. I also hope to continue with the “spotlight” features, where I discuss a particular company and what they have to offer. As I mentioned in the “About” section, you won’t see anything about pop-up trailers here. Nothing personal against the owners of these trailers, but I’m just not a fan of pop-ups. The closest thing to a pop-up I might ever discuss would be an A-frame, hard-sided pop-up such as an A-Liner or a Chalet. I figured I’d need a cut-off size-wise. I picked 20′ simply because it was a nice round number, but that’s not to say I might not mention something  a little larger if it fits what I’m writing about.

Hopefully as time rolls on, I’ll develop some relationships with manufacturers so I can bring some content to you on a more frequent basis. I’m making some progress in that area with some smaller, up & coming manufacturers who’ve given me a lot of good info that have generated a lot of hits on the site. And if you’re a manufacturer or representative of a manufacturer who’d like me to talk about your company or trailer, feel free to contact me at roadmaven@yahoo.com. As always, thanks for reading…

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